Tagged: heart

A New Year – 2014

New Year's Eve celebration

“Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

It has been quite a while since I’ve made a post on this site, but I have not forgotten about it. Stepping away for a minute, although unintentional, gave me the opportunity to learn more about myself and to reaffirm my purpose for creating this blog in the first place. I started this site with the intention of uplifting others.  My goal was and continues to be to inspire others to be the best versions of themselves.  With each post, I aim to spread love and light to those who are open and willing to receive it. As I read through the older posts, I feel as though my past year of writing provides a solid foundation for me to expand upon in 2014 with greater focus and purpose.

Looking back on 2013, I am grateful for the many expressions of love that I witnessed. The past year’s events have inspired me to more deeply share the divine love within and to live in purpose every NOW moment. Along with some of the reflective questions that I wrote in my End of the Year – 2012  post, some questions that I ask myself as the new year begins are:

How can I be of greater service to the world? In what ways, can I give and show support to another? How can I authentically express the divine love that I am? 

In this new year, earnestly intend to give love and be love. Set out to be of service not for fame or reward, but with the understanding that the value is in the giving. Aspire to spread love to all of creation with every thought, word and action.  In moments where you may fall short of your intention, forgive yourself and refocus on love. And if you feel as though your efforts are insignificant or not enough, understand that your positive energy always has an effect – even if you cannot recognize it.

For the past several years, I’ve started a practice of claiming that the new year will be the best year of my life so far. As I speak that into existence for myself, I wish the same for you. May your year be filled with an abundance of love, joy, and peace. Happy New Year!

Love,

Joseph

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The Strength of Vulnerability

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.”

Brené Brown 

heart_weights

Somehow in our society it has become commonplace to think that someone who shows their emotions is weak and someone who is stoic and seemingly unbothered by life’s challenges is strong. However, that idea couldn’t be more wrong. The exact opposite is true. When we allow ourselves to be vulnerable in a given moment, it is then that we are actually displaying our true strength.

As men, we are often taught that being emotional and being in touch with our feelings is a sign of weakness. They say, “It is only proper for girls to be vulnerable. Men aren’t supposed to have negative emotions outside of anger. Men are definitely not supposed to express those negative emotions. And there is absolutely no excuse for a man to ever cry.” But as a human-being, we all have emotions. Positive and negative. Our emotions are meant to be felt and expressed. With this understanding, we can move from a place of letting our ego be in control, to really letting our soul shine through.

One of the most important things that we can do is to teach our children and our youth how to express their feelings. So many times we tell our kids to “Suck it up” or “Stop crying and don’t be sad“. Such statements are often made by loving parents who do not want to see their children hurt and in pain. The error is that we are teaching our children to deny their feelings. We are teaching them that they should not feel any type of sadness or hurt. Instead, what we should be teaching our youth is how to feel their emotions and let them pass as they naturally will.  What ends up happening is that instead of learning how to feel their emotions, children start to build up walls to protect themselves from feeling much at all. These walls often carry into their adult lives and create unnecessary struggles for them in the forms of  trust issues, defensiveness, and sabotaging a good thing in the fear of being hurt by it. By guiding our children through the right way to deal with their feelings, we can help them establish strong emotional grounding that will support them as they grow into adults.

I’ve found that one of my biggest challenges has been opening up my heart again and expressing those emotions that are deep inside. Sometimes it seems easier for me to pretend as though everything is okay, rather than to let someone know that I am actually upset or saddened by something. But as I am learning, I see that without feeling you are not truly alive. You have to be able to feel. 

It is okay to have feelings of sadness, of heartbreak, of despair, of hopelessness and of other negative emotions at times. What is not okay is ignoring your feelings as if they don’t exist. When emotions are kept bottled up, it is unhealthy on many levels. Bottled up emotions often are the root of extreme expressions such as rage and tantrums. And they are also the cause of many physical dis-eases such as ulcers, cancers, etc.

Many people use different things to numb their pain instead of feeling it. Some of these things may include working a lot, eating in excess,  drinking alcohol on a regular basis, excessive shopping, etc. All of these things are distractions that keep you from feeling those negative emotions that are deep within. The way to move past these extreme behaviors and addictions is to feel whatever pain you’re avoiding. Deal with those issues and allow all of those feelings to come up no matter how painful they may be. What you are not willing to deal with and face, you will not be able to heal. Don’t use your behaviors as an excuse to stay stuck in sadness, hurt, anger, etc.

It takes a vulnerably strong person to say that “I am sorry.” It takes a vulnerably strong person to say that “I was afraid.” It takes strength to show your heart. Much like with many things in life, the more you practice being vulnerable and living from your heartspace, the easier it will become to act from that place in more of life’s situations.

Being vulnerable doesn’t mean that you are being gullible or too free in sharing yourself. It simply means that you are willing to express your emotional truth in a given moment.

Being vulnerable is really just being open. Open to the good things and the bad things. Without one or the other, we wouldn’t be having a full life experience. An open heart may experience heartache but a closed heart cannot feel love. If you’re too busy worrying about protecting yourself from being hurt all the time, you may miss out on all of the love and joy that could come in the most unexpected of ways. I offer you to see vulnerability as one of your greatest strengths. You may find that you’re stronger than you had ever imagined.

Love,

Joseph